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Very cool -- so about 160,000 moons would basically wallpaper the entire sky! :)

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Mar 13Liked by Phil Plait

Oh man, that's a whole lotta numbers and calculations! A bit of a challenge for me, because 1 I have minor dyscalculia, 2 I have math insight of a mouse and c I'm Dutch so I need a fraction more time to grasp the math lingo. But I do get it when you explain in words, so that's about half of this newsletter, which makes me radiant to realize that I don't have to struggle with the math in order to understand what you're writing about. I think I'll have that pi(e) now. :)

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Mar 13Liked by Phil Plait

"...the area of the sky is 4 x π x 57.3^2 = 41,253 square degrees."

OK, I know I'm math-challenged, amd pretty much everything you said after that makes sense (and I think I saw where you were going to get to distance measurement - kinda cool!), but that statement seems to make no sense. What does "area of the sky" even mean? Horizon to horizon, in all directions?

P.S. I much prefer (since it looks more "normal") your second method of calculating that figure; it doesn't have to play with "radian-as-distance".

P.P.S. - Happy pi(e) day a bit early! (at approximately 1:59 - either AM or PM)!

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Mar 13Liked by Phil Plait

When my husband and I were active in the RASC, we were taught some "handy" (pun intended) methods for measuring arc distance in the sky: thumb extended at arm's length = 1/2 deg; fist = 10 deg; fingers spread = 15 deg (I may be getting those numbers wrong because it was a really really long time ago). These measurement were useful when trying to find objects relative to others.

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Mar 13Liked by Phil Plait

"It still occupies 1/2 π ᵗʰ of the circle’s circumference": adding "one-half πth" (rhymes with "writhe," pronounced like "PIEth") to list of memorable fractions...

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